What Parent Doesn’t Want the Best for Their Child?


Meet your new cousin!

This week, our family was blessed when the stork delivered a beautiful bundle of joy to my cousins. Seryn is the first baby produced by my generation and in her three days in our lives she has brought much joy to everyone from her mommy and daddy to her great-grandpa.

This was the first time I went to a hospital to meet a baby, and I was struck by the amazing optimism and joy. I wondered if it’s like that for every family when a baby is born.

See, I know every family wants the best for their children, but sometimes the world throws curveballs that parents can’t handle and the children suffer.

How many of our students’ parents brought their babies into the world with joy and optimism, only to have that all replaced by situations they can’t handle effectively (poverty, health issues, disabilities, etc)? Do we assume too quickly that certain parents have given up on their children?

I know Seryn will be surrounded by oodles and oodles of love (oodles = a lot). She’s already been in the arms of so many, and she will always have support.

Not all families are as attentive and loving. Maybe they don’t have the resources, human or otherwise. But their children are their children, nonetheless. We must be sure not to quickly pass judgement and must try to assume the best of every parent. What parent doesn’t want the best for their child?

 
Creative Commons License
Meet your new cousin! by Matthew Schreiber is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at photomatt7.files.wordpress.com.

Creative Commons License
Baby's Feet by Matthew S. Ray is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at photomatt7.files.wordpress.com.

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2 responses to “What Parent Doesn’t Want the Best for Their Child?

  1. A quote that I like is that “Parents send us the best children they can.” We might bemoan their situation and wish they could have a different home to go home to but I do believe that parents are doing their best to raise their children, they just may not have the resources, knowledge, support, ability that we would wish them to have.

  2. Sometimes the simple, but powerful question, ‘What do you hope for your child?” quickly demonstrates parents’ care and love for their child and serves to strengthen and inform the service team of student, family members and educators.

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